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Scoring Rubric

Name____________________________
Blog  Name______________________________________________________

BLOG (200 pts)
About Us
Photo (of author) _______(10 pts)
Introduction __________(10 pts)
Posts
# of posts (min. 30 by May 4 @ 3 pts each) ___(90 pts)
Links in posts (min. 45) ________________(50 pts)
Content relevant to topic _______________ (20 pts)
Appropriate headline, copy, grammar, punctuation, etc. __________(20 pts)

PODCASTS (300 pts)

#1 Music In/out __________ (10 pts)
One voice ______________ (20 pts)
Content relevant to topic (grammar, pronunciation, etc.) __________ (20 pts)
Editing, dead spots, overlaps __________ (20 pts)
Length (2:00-3:00) _________________(10 pts)

#2 Music In/out __________ (10 pts)
Two voices ______________ (30 pts)
Sound effects ____________ (15 pts)
Content relevant to topic (grammar, pronunciation, etc.) __________ (20 pts)
Editing, dead spots, overlaps __________ (20 pts)
Length (2:00-3:00) _________________(10 pts)

#3 Music In/out __________ (10 pts)
Three voices ____________ (40 pts)
Sound effects ____________(15 pts)
Content relevant to topic (grammar, pronunciation, etc.) __________ (20 pts)
Editing, dead spots, overlaps __________ (20 pts)
Length (2:00-3:00) _________________(10 pts)

SOUND AND SLIDE (100 pts)* (due April 14)
Photographs (30-40), quality, blog-related _________________(40 pts)
Audio (music or voice), quality, photo-related _______________(40 pts)
Use of both music and voice- extra credit ___________________(5 pts)
Editing (photos, audio, timing- 2:00-3:00, etc.) ______________(10 pts)
Title, captions _____________________________________(10 pts)

VIDEOCAST (100 pts)*(due April 21)
Video (2:00-3:00), quality, blog-related ___________________(40 pts)
Audio (voice over and natural sound) quality ________________(40 pts)
Editing (video, audio) ________________________________(20 pts)

*20 pt. deduction for late assignments.

FINAL EXAM (must be completed by May 3, 2017 @ 11:59 p.m. ) (300 pts)

Post- ON SEPARATE PAGE OF BLOG- LABELED FINAL
Feature style (50 pts)
Links in post (min. 3) (30 pts)
Appropriate headline, copy, grammar, punctuation, etc. _______(20 pts)

Podcast
Music In/out ______________ (10 pts)
Two voices ________________ (30 pts)
Sound effects _____________ (10 pts)
Content relevant to topic (grammar, pronunciation, etc.) ______________ (20 pts)
Editing, dead spots, overlaps _______ (20 pts)
Length (2:00-3:00) _____________ (10 pts)

Sound and Slide OR Videocast (pick one)

Sound and Slide

Photographs (30-40), quality, _____________________ (40 pts)
Audio (music or voice), quality, photo-related __________ (40 pts)
Use of both music and voice- extra credit _____________ (5 pts)
Editing (photos, audio, timing- 2:00-3:00, etc.) ________ (10 pts)
Title, captions _______________________________ (10 pts)

Videocast

Video (2:00-3:00), quality, ______________________ (40 pts)
Audio (voice over and natural sound) quality __________ (40 pts)
Editing (video, audio) __________________________ (20 pts)

* 60 pt. deduction for late final project (unacceptable after May 7, 2015.

Example of your final exam

Here is an example of how the elements that you have learned in this class are being used in media TODAY.
This example utilizes a post in combination with a podcast, a video and a slideshow (but, this one has no sound).
Yes, this is what I expect of your Final Exam.
Check it out, click Making Vinyl Records.

Final Exam: due 11:59 p.m. May 3

Your COMM 1030 Final Exam is due at 11:59 p.m., Wednesday, May 3.*
No exceptions!
You will use a variety of skills that you have learned in this class to produce a Multi-Media Feature Story.
Good Luck!

I WILL NOT ACCEPT ANY ASSIGNMENTS AFTER NOON, MAY 4!

It MUST include:

Story
– Post it on an additional and separate page of your blog.
– Label Final Exam page appropriately.
– Write a Feature Story (correct  style)- 50 pts.
– Include appropriate links throughout your Feature Story- 30 pts.
– Correct headline, copy, grammar, punctuation, etc.- 20 pts.

Podcast
– Music in and out- 10 pts.
– Two voices (minimum)- 30 pts.
– Sound effects- 10 pts.
– Content relevant to topic (grammar, pronunciation, etc.)- 20 pts.
– Editing: delete deadspots, overlaps, etc.- 20 pts.
– Length (2:00-3:00)- 10 pts.

Sound/Slide OR Videocast (select one)
Sound/Slide
– Photographs (30-40), quality- 40 pts.
– Audio (music or voice), quality, photo-related- 40 pts.
(use of both music AND voice- extra credit)- 5 pts.
– Editing (photos, audio, embedding, timing- 2:00-3:00)- 10 pts.
– Titles and caption- 10 pts.
Videocast
– Video (2:00-3:00), quality- 40 pts.
– Audio (voice over and natural sound), quality- 40 pts.
– Editing (video, audio, embedding)- 20 pts.

* 60 pt. deduction for late assignment, until Noon, May 4.
I WILL NOT ACCEPT ANY ASSIGNMENTS AFTER NOON, MAY 4!

Why we need multimedia NOW!

By Gabby Herbst
To say that our students need to learn to create and publish their own multimedia videos is an understatement.  During his first semester in college in New York, one of my students applied for an internship at a local newspaper. The editor-in-chief, after doing research about this student on the Internet, said he was hired not for his writing skills or leadership positions held on his high school newspaper staff, but because he knew how to make multimedia videos.

Adding multimedia to print-based or online journalism programs can no longer wait. No matter the medium of your school’s publications, multimedia is essential for today’s news consumers.

Why we need multimedia now

In 2010, the Pew Research Center found that more and more media consumers are using digital platforms to digest their news.  And Americans love to consume their news! The average time Americans spend with the news is back to levels not seen since the mid-1990s (George-Palilonis, 2013). And one of the fastest growing pieces to consume is mobile video. According to a 2011 Nielsen report, mobile video users grew by 57 percent in 2009 to 17.6 million from 11.2 million people. And Pew has also found that 63 percent of adults watch videos and news videos online.  And as we all know as educators working with teens, there’s nothing they love more than being on their mobile devices!

How to get it done

It is time for our scholastic media outlets to catch up to the professionals, and perhaps even surpass them. Already have a website?  Just embed multimedia into posts. Only working in print? Create a specialized channel on School Tube, Vimeo or YouTube and direct your readers there with ads in your paper or via social media.

Below is a Prezi that I deliver to my Beginning Journalism class each year, and also presented at the 2014 Spring National High School Journalism Convention. Want further clarification? Have questions? Watch me present the most up to date version at the Fall 2014 Convention in Washington, D.C.

http://prezi.com/bk6z6lomgx0i/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy

Most important element in storytelling

If you haven’t got me interested with your your first sentence, I’m out.

I’m fickle, ruthless and impatient with online content. And I’m not alone.

Journalists have always known the importance of snappy headlines and crafting a lead that makes a reader want to know more.

That’s why most stories written are in an ‘inverted pyramid’ style, with the most pressing information at the top and less information (traditionally it could be cut from a printed page) at the bottom.

With digital distractions (yes, I’m looking at you social media) all over the web, it’s important to remember that your reader is only one click from moving on. Your headline and your lead function as ‘the hook’, and are the most important element of great online storytelling. Imagine yourself fishing for readers in a sea of content – and those cat videos you scoff at? Those are tantalizing hooks.

A good hook isn’t just a feature of a text post – they’re just as important when introducing video, infographics, etc. You have to grab your reader, before they move on.

I’ll be talking about crafting great online content, including headlines, hooks and more, at the upcoming Social Capital Conference in Ottawa on July 26, but I’d like to give you some easy pointers to consider when sharpening your hook and writing a lead to keep them on your page:

  • Your lead should continue the thought of the headline, not repeat it
  • Keep your lead short and punchy
  • Get to the point quickly – long and flowy rarely works
  • ONE point only – don’t get bogged down in detail
  • Your lead should be 25 words or less.
  • Yes, I said 25 words MAX. Take a deep breath, you can do this.

Uploading videos to the web

By Don Goble, JEADigitalMedia.org
YouTube is still a popular choice due to its potential of an enormous audience. Here are a couple of step-by-step guides if this is your choice to host.

Tips for Shooting Great Video

1. Camera

Of course you’ll need a camera. To make a good video, the TYPE of camera is irrelevant. Use a Flip, a consumer grade, iPhone, Android, iPad, whatever.

What your camera DOES need is a way to capture audio either with a solid built-in mic or an external mic jack. I PREFER the camera have an external mic jack, but work with what you have! To record, use an SD card, tape, internal hard drive…. again, doesn’t matter. Record any way you can and we will help you transfer it to your computer easily in a later post.

2. Audio
I will watch a video that is poorly shot, but has great audio. I will not watch a video that I can’t hear, no matter how beautiful the picture is. I highly recommend using a camera that you can plug a microphone into. I even use cheap $7 external mics from Radio Shack. They work.

However, if you don’t have a camera with an external mic, no problem. Just GET CLOSE to your subject if you are using the internal camera mic. No problem as long as you get close.

3. Lighting
Proper lighting is key. Here’s the main rule of thumb: Always make sure the light is behind the CAMERA, not your SUBJECT (person or thing.) Also, never shoot directly into bright light. Lighting is an issue videographers constantly struggle with. No worries. Just follow the rule, Light behind the camera, not the subject.

4. Tripod
Always, always, always use a tripod! Shaky shots are distracting. Yes, the handheld technique can be effective. Let’s talk about that later. Use a tripod! I am guaranteed to watch your video if it is steady.

If you are using a camera that doesn’t connect to a tripod, again, no worries. I tell my kids, “The world is your tripod!”  Find a chair, a stack of books, a desk, a banister, some kind of flat, non-moving surface and set your camera on it and shoot. Steady shots are key.

5. Tell a story
Every good video tells a story with a beginning, middle and end. If you follow the 4 steps above, but skip this step, you will not have a video worth watching. Tell a story. I would even look past ANY of the 4 steps above, if your video tells a story that I’m interested in.

Everyone has a story to tell. Plan out your beginning, middle and end BEFORE you begin shooting, and you can make a great video.

Of course, you will then need to edit your video, so check out Matt Rasgorshek’s tips here. Just wanted to cover shooting in this post.

If you master these 5 steps, feel free to move on to ways to positively impact your video content.